Shadowrun Awakening

News Dump, March/April

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> CYBER-CLINIC CEO COMMITS SUICIDE OVER SUSPECTED CHILD RESEARCH

    Hong Kong Free Economic Zone – Three Days Ago

 

>Picture: A grainy low-rez image of a body, apparently fallen from a building into a crowded Tokyo street.

 

    Cybernetically enhanced citizens in waiting rooms across Hong Kong were in for a surprise last Monday as groups of HKPF’s High Threat Response Team raided a number of cyberclinic franchises under the umbrella of the Anateus Research Group, known commonly as the Anateus Group. Teams of men and women of Hong Kong’s Finest swept into each clinic within the Free Economic Zone with even marginal ties to the company, brandishing warrants and detaining as necessary. This is coming hot on the heels of a controversial leak last Friday from the hacker collective known only as Dredge that the Anateus Group was experimenting on kidnapped children for some secret, unknown purpose. No statement has been released verifying the legitimacy of these claims, though it is suspected Dredge came across this data during the attack on their research headquarters here in Hong Kong itself.

The mere speculation however, led to a tanking of company stock price so severe that the CEO, Dr. M. Kuren, committed suicide by leaping from the top of his Tokyo penthouse. He appears to have no surviving relatives. Without his guidance, Parent Company Renraku Spokesperson Hayo Kimihara suggests the assets of the company will be liquidated, and (it is speculated) will be completed before the allegations are proven true or not.

 

>  TRADING SHIPS TRAPPED IN HARBOR DUE TO DATABASE ERRORS, SAILORS TRAPPED AT SEA

    Sea Of Japan – Yesterday, 9:24 PM

 

>Picture: Night Shot of Tanker Ship Stuck Out At Sea, Lights On

 

A tiny tug drifts up to the stalling tanker Ishimura, who had reported engine trouble and requested an escort to port. Gently, the tug encircles the rusted hulk of a ship and begins pulling it ashore, a small jaunt of only two or three miles away.

 

This show of aid must have stung for Captain Adrian Venderblight, less than 400 feet away from the stalled ship. For him, those two or three miles might as well be an eternity. His angry bullhorn joins voices with a cacophany of others that sound across the bay.

 

It started with a simple file error. Yet soon by the time trading closed that day the entirety of Southern China’s Port Authority Registry had collapsed into a pile of unrecognisable data. And, while backups were restored early the following morning, Captain Adrian’s Wager appears to be one of many ships missing from the registry.

 

This presents a number of problems. Without a proper manifest of cargo transit and destination, shareholders and investors in shipping lines, who often invest capital in the form of cargo to be moved, cannot safely assure they’ll be compensated when their supplies reach port. While duplicate files have been sent, the nature of the People’s Republic of China’s elaborate and draconian bureaucracy coupled with the severity of the damage means that those files may not get updated for a long time.

 

For Captain Adrian and his crew, this means they cannot go home, but there are risks posed by this slowdown on shore too. Dr. Mia Nyo, a doctor in a nearby province, worries that ships carrying medical supplies and other aid goods, even basic simple trade goods, will not arrive in time.

    “For some of these towns, imported goods are a huge and vital influx to the economy, and increases the quality of goods and services in the area. If they cannot make it to the port to be sold….”

 

As of yet, the Port Authority has declined to comment on when this issue will be resolved.



 

> FAWN: ASIA DEBUT TOUR OFF TO ROCKY START DUE TO PROTESTS

    Seoul, Korea – 1 week ago

 

>Image 1: Promotional Image of hit popstar Fawn singing before an audience

>Image 2: Protesters brandishing signs denouncing Korea’s decision to join the Sea Of Japan Trade Alliance (SOJTA), ratified by their Parliament last Tuesday.

 

When Herta Glenfaith (17) stepped off the private red-eye from Amsterdam last Tuesday, she was greeted by hundreds of cheering fans, and the even louder chanting of protesters. The breakout indie artist, who performs under the stage name Fawn, is the daughter of celebrated 72’ Arguments of Berlin guitarist Andrekai Glenfaith. Her debut album, SINGALS, topped the Horizon charts at number three, the highest ever for a unsigned artist to date. Last Tuesday was supposed to be the start of her Asia tour to promote the album, and by all accounts was a rocky start.

 

    “At first I didn’t notice anything was off. I just thought the crowd was huge,” Herta tells us. “Then my eyes adjusted to the floodlights and I saw the helicopters.”

 

    Protestors against the Korean Parliament's decision to join many other Southeast Asian nations in SOJTA (Read More here)

picketed Seoul Incheon International Airport that night, shouting obscenities at foreigners and expressing general Anti-Japanese sentiments that have been common among the country since the end of WWII. While the heads of Parliament seemed to have cooled enough to adopt a friendlier stance, the general population seems to feel otherwise.

 

    Gleaming silver White Jacket helicopters circled the area, and a contingent of White Jacket Riot Response teams were on standby in case the mob grew violent.

 

    “When it was explained to me what was happening, I was worried. I didn’t know how the crowd would react to someone like me,” Herta continues. The young artist was rushed to an unmarked car and carried swiftly away from the scene. Luckily, her concert the following night was met with a massive turnout, and it appears her number of fans grows by the month. Next on her tour is Pongyang, followed by Hong Kong, followed by Tokyo, Chiba City, and a final farewell concert back in Seoul. Pre-Order your ticket at…

 

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